This is a traditional corn cobb pipe good for the beginner or for a quick smoke.

Choose from:

  • Maple – straight stem
    Length 5 6/8″
    Bowl Height  1  3/4″
    Bowl Width Outside  1 1/4″
    Bowl Width Inside  3/4″
  • Cherry – bent stem
    Length 5 1/2″
    Bowl Height  1  1/2″
    Bowl Width Outside  1″
    Bowl Width Inside  7/8″
    All sizes are approximate.

This product is currently out of stock and unavailable.

SKU: 03-304 Category: Tags: , , , Product ID: 27262

Description

Corn Cobb Maple/Cherry Ozark 2000

This is a traditional corn cobb maple or cherry pipe good for the beginner or for a quick smoke.

Corn Cobb Maple/Cherry Ozark 2000

A tobacco pipe, often called simply a pipe, is a device specifically made to smoke tobacco. It comprises a chamber (the bowl) for the tobacco from which a thin hollow stem (shank) emerges, ending in a mouthpiece (the bit). Pipes can range from very simple machine-made briar models to highly prized hand-made artisanal implements made by renowned pipemakers, which are often very expensive collector’s items. Pipe smoking is the oldest known traditional form of tobacco smoking.

Smoking pipes of various types have been used since ancient times. Herodotus described Scythians inhaling the fumes of burning leaves in 500 B.C.

Some Native American cultures smoke tobacco in ceremonial pipes, and have done so since long before the arrival of Europeans. For instance the Lakota people use a ceremonial pipe called čhaŋnúŋpa. Other American Indian cultures smoke tobacco socially. The tobacco plant is native to South America but spread into North America long before Europeans arrived. Tobacco was introduced to Europe from the Americas in the 16th century and spread around the world rapidly.

As tobacco was not introduced to the Old World until the 16th century, the older pipes outside of the Americas were usually used to smoke hashish, a rare and expensive substance outside areas of the Middle East, Central Asia and India, where it was then produced.

 

Principle

A pipe’s fundamental function is to provide a relatively safe, manipulable volume in which to incompletely combust tobacco (and/or other smokable substances) while allowing the smoke drawn from this combustion to cool sufficiently for inhalation by the smoker. Typically this is accomplished by connecting a refractory ‘bowl’ to some sort of ‘stem’ which extends and cools the smoke mixture drawn through the combusting organic mass (see below).

Parts

Parts of a pipe include the (1) bowl, (2) chamber, (3) draught hole, (4) shank, (5) mortise, (6) tenon, (7) stem, (8) bit (or mouthpiece), (9) lip, and (10) bore.

The broad anatomy of a pipe typically comprises mainly the bowl and the stem. The bowl (1) which is the cup-like outer shell, the part hand-held while packing, holding and smoking a pipe, is also the part “knocked” top-down to loosen and release impacted spent tobacco. On being sucked, the general stem delivers the smoke from the bowl to the user’s mouth.

Inside the bowl is an inner chamber (2) space holding tobacco pressed into it. This draught hole (3), is for air flow where air has travelled through the tobacco in the chamber, taking the smoke with it, up the shank (4). At the end of the shank, the pipe’s mortise (5) and tenon (6) join is an air-tight, simple connection of two detachable parts where the mortise is a hole met by the tenon, a tight-fitting “tongue” at the start of the stem (7). Known as the bore (10), the inner shaft of this second section stays uniform throughout while the outer stem tapers down to the mouthpiece or bit (8) held in the smoker’s teeth, and finally ends in the “lip” (9), attenuated for comfort.

Materials

The bowls of tobacco pipes are commonly made of briar wood, meerschaum, corncob or clay. Less common are other dense-grained woods such as cherry, olive, maple, mesquite, oak, and bog-wood. Minerals such as catlinite and soapstone have also been used. Pipe bowls are sometimes decorated by carving, and moulded clay pipes often had simple decoration in the mould.

Unusual, but still noteworthy pipe materials include gourds, as in the famous calabash pipe, and pyrolytic graphite.

The stem needs a long channel of constant position and diameter running through it for a proper draw, although filter pipes have varying diameters and can be successfully smoked even without filters or adapters. Because it is molded rather than carved, clay may make up the entire pipe or just the bowl, but most other materials have stems made separately and detachable. Stems and bits of tobacco pipes are usually made of moldable materials like vulcanite, lucite, Bakelite, and soft plastic. Less common are stems made of reeds, bamboo, or hollowed out pieces of wood. Expensive pipes once had stems made of amber, though this is rare now.

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Additional information

Weight 0.1 lbs
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